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Crypto prices shot lower with BTCUSD tumbling to a 3-month at $38.5k in early trade this morning (Wednesday), now looking to test the long-term trend line from the ramp at the tail end of last year. There is a major bleed across the entire crypto space today, and both Bitcoin and Ether are 30% lower across the last 7 days, and Bitcoin has now given back all the gains made since Tesla announced in early February that it invested $1.5bn in the asset.

Spurring the move lower today is news that Chinese financial regulators have instructed financial and payment institutions not to accept cryptocurrencies as payment nor offer related services or products. Cryptos are “seriously infringing on the safety of people’s property and disrupting the normal economic and financial order,” three industry bodies said in a joint statement on the PBOC WeChat account.


China has for some time been putting pressure on the crypto space, but this marks an intensification – other countries might follow now as central banks make strides towards their own digital currencies. Until now western regulators have been pretty relaxed about Bitcoin, but this might change soon.

MicroStrategy doubles down on Bitcoin

The crypto bros have had a hard time lately. First, they got down on their knees to the saviour Elon Musk as he pumped up Bitcoin and Doge. Then they got mad because he called one a hustle and signalled that he wasn’t all that keen on the other after all. Musk clearly gets all the spotlight, but it’s also worth looking at Michael Saylor, founder of MicroStrategy. The company is doubling down on Bitcoin, with Saylor saying yesterday it had purchased an additional 229 Bitcoins for $10.0 million in cash at an average price of about $43,663. “As of 5/18/2021, we #hodl ~92,079 bitcoins acquired for ~$2.251 billion at an average price of ~24,450 per bitcoin,” he tweeted. YOLO. Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao tweeted “Legend,” in response.

Shares in MSTR are down about 60% since the Feb peak when Tesla announced its investment in Bitcoin. Saylor has been a longer-term Bitcoin bull than many and last year led a major pivot in terms of corporate acceptance of crypto assets that helped fuel the rally through to the recent all-time highs. If you recall in February MicroStrategy said it had sold $1bn in convertible debt to buy more Bitcoin.

So now you have a situation where a publicly listed stock with a market cap of almost $5bn is seemingly entirely dependent on the price of Bitcoin remaining above $24k. This seems entirely odd. I can barely remember what the company actually does. Not a lot is apparently the answer: just $122.9m in revenue in Q1, with a net loss of $110m.

As of March 31st, MSTR had cash and cash equivalents of $82.5 million. If Bitcoin tanks, there does not appear to be much wiggle room. No wonder short interest remains at 16%. Saylor might be right, he might be wrong, but rather like we have discussed before with Tesla: are corporate balance sheets the place for Bitcoin speculation, given that people are not using it to transact?

Listen: Podcast: Stephen Ehrlich, CEO of Voyager Digital, on trading and investing in cryptocurrencies

What is the options market telling us about BTC?

So now we come to the options market and what it’s telling us about Bitcoin, which is that investors feel there is further to pull back from here, or at least there was before prices dropped under a huge wedge of puts at $40k. Even long-term hodlers think it can drop further. Which makes you question what kind of mark to market losses MSTR will have to report.

Which comes back to the point as to why a company which is not in the business of making investment decisions, like say Berkshire Hathaway or Baillie Gifford, is busy making bold investment decisions in an asset that is at best understood by a few, and at worst a complete scam. Moreover, the company’s investments are entirely concentrated in a single asset – like Berkshire only owning Apple, and becoming a proxy to the stock itself. This is not like a company that needs to buy 10m Deutsche marks because it’s opening a factory in Stuttgart. It’s not an airline purchasing oil puts as a hedge against its jet fuel costs. It is not even like investing in a stock like Apple, with a call on their future cash flows, dividends etc.

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Please note this article does not constitute investment advice. Investors are encouraged to do their own research beforehand or consult a professional advisor.

Stuart Fieldhouse

Stuart Fieldhouse

Stuart Fieldhouse has spent 25 years in journalism and marketing, including as a wealth management editor for the Financial Times group, covering capital markets and international private banking, and as an investment banking correspondent for Euromoney in Hong Kong. He was the founder editor of The Hedge Fund Journal.

Stuart has worked at CMC Markets, supporting the re-launch of its global financial spread betting and CFD trading platforms. He is also the author of two books on trading, published by Financial Times Pearson. Based in The Armchair Trader’s London office, Stuart continues to advise fund managers, private banks, family offices and other financial institutions.

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