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We have already had two changes to the FTSE 100 membership since the last reshuffle in December, thanks to successful bids for Randgold Resources and Shire, who were replaced by Auto Trader and Hikma, and the next rejig of the benchmark may bring further changes.

Oil equipment and services specialist Wood Group’s £3.7 billion valuation leaves it ranked 108th in the market capitalisation rankings, just above 111th spot, which means automatic relegation to the FTSE 250. Any sudden 4% to 5% drop in its share price could jeopardise the company’s FTSE 100 status, which it only regained in the fourth quarter of last year once Sky was acquired by Comcast.

Other firms whose market valuations lie near the approximate £3.6 billion cut-off point include gambling services giant GVC, and Hikma, although both should be safe this time around, as they lie in the £3.9 billion to £4 billion price bracket.

“Even if Wood avoids automatic relegation it could still slide out of the index should any FTSE 250 firms reach the 90th spot by market cap, as that would earn them automatic promotion,” says Russ Mould, AJ Bell’s investment director. “Just Eat is hovering around that mark, with a market cap of £4.8 billion and – with a few days still to go – other names within a few hundred million pounds’ worth of automatic entry to the UK’s corporate elite include life fund consolidator Phoenix Group and JD Sports Fashion.”

Wood Group’s latest stay in the FTSE 100 membership seems destined to be as brief as its previous ones. Promotions in April 2008, March 2011 and September 2012 were swiftly followed by demotion in September 2008, September 2011 and September 2013. If the group is again relegated then its stay this time will be barely five months, following its elevation in October when Comcast bought Sky.

Don’t look for new energy entrants to the FTSE 100

Sentiment does appear to have soured on the wider oil services and equipment sector. In December Wood Hunting issued a relatively downbeat outlook for 2019, citing oil companies’ ongoing capital discipline and budgetary caution thanks to a retreat in the price of crude from its peak near $80 a barrel back toward the $60 mark in the second half of last year.

All of the major FTSE indices are reviewed on a quarterly basis. They are set according to share prices from the close of business on the Tuesday before the first Friday of the review month (which in this case is December). The changes come into effect in mid-to-late December.

In general, a stock will be promoted into the FTSE100 membership at the quarterly review if it rises to 90th position, or above (by market capitalisation) and a stock will be demoted if it falls to 111th (by market value), providing it fulfils the other criteria, such as free float and a presence on the Main Market.

Please note this article does not constitute investment advice. Investors are encouraged to do their own research beforehand or consult a professional advisor.

Vanya Dragomanovic

Vanya Dragomanovic

Vanya is an award-winning financial journalist who has worked in both television and newswires. She spent over 10 years at Dow Jones covering commodity markets, including metals, coffee, cocoa and oil. She also reported from the floor of the London Metals Exchange, and appeared on CNBC to discuss international metals markets. Since then she has written for several leading financial publications, including serving as commodities editor for FTSE Global Markets.

Vanya continues to cover international commodities markets globally, specialising in particular on metals and alternative energy. She is also the author of a book on CFD trading.

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